Updated: 05 March 2013 04:30 PM
Holi One Colour Festival Cape Town 2013 - Updated!

A Celebration of Colour and Freedom



The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
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  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
  • The Cape Town Holi One Colour Festival took place on March 2 at the Grand Parade in Cape Town to celebrate freedom and colour. (© Gallo Images)
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The Holi One Colour open-air Festival took place in Cape Town over the weekend, taking inspiration from the first festival that was held in Germany.

Although not linked to the religious aspects of the original Hindu festival of colour – called Holika Dahan or Holi - the festival does share some of its values, such as featuring festival-goers all dressed in white who end up being covered in all the brilliant and bright colours of the rainbow.

Local musicians added to the vibrant atmosphere of the celebration as coloured powders were thrown in the air by the revellers to express the freedom and colour of everyday life.

Not everyone is pleased with the festival, however. According to a TimesLive report, the President of the South African Hindu Maha Saba, Ashwin Trikamjee, explained that the festival was devoted to the worship of deities such as Ganesh-Gauri, Kalash and Shri Krishna. Prayer was an important part of the festival, and a ritual involved burning offerings in a fire to inspire blessings from god. Worshippers then spread coloured powders on each other.

He was not pleased with the ‘commercialised’ version of the festival.

Regardless, the festival went ahead as planned over the weekend, leaving many smiling as they were covered in bright powders. The Johannesburg version of the event takes place in early April.

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In other news:

The 2013 Cape Town Pride Parade
World's Oldest Woman Turns 115 in Japan
The Pope's Farewell Address

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